Category Archives: Infringement

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Willfulness After Halo: Now What?

The general consensus is that the Supreme Court’s June decision in Halo Electronics v. Pulse Electronics eased the path to proving willfulness, as discussed previously on IP Litigation Current. Many speculated that one result of the Halo decision would be an increase in the value of patents, since a finding of willfulness may lead to trebling of damages. … Continue reading this entry

The Evolving Standard for Pleading Direct Patent Infringement

It has been a little more than half a year since the amendments to the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure abrogated Rule 84 and put an end to the Form 18 bare-bones style patent complaint.  The question on the minds of many patent litigators has been: What standard would emerge for pleading direct patent infringement … Continue reading this entry

No Due Process Violation Where Judgment Entered on Patents Not Asserted at Trial

A recent case reminds litigators to be diligent in protecting their clients’ due-process rights when narrowing a case for trial or risk forfeiting the right to trial altogether.  In Nuance Communications v. ABBYY USA Software House, Inc., the Federal Circuit ruled that due process rights were not violated when a district court entered judgment of … Continue reading this entry

Important Decisions on the Scope of the ITC's Authority

In the latter half of 2015, the Federal Circuit in Suprema v. ITC and ClearCorrect v. ITC issued two decisions addressing the scope of the International Trade Commission’s (“ITC”) authority to exclude infringing articles.  In Suprema v. ITC (2012-1170) (en banc), the Federal Circuit ruled that the ITC’s authority included the authority to address induced … Continue reading this entry

Supreme Court on Induced Infringement: Good-Faith Belief of Invalidity Not a Defense and Knowledge of Infringement Required

In a 6-2 decision this week, the United States Supreme Court in Commil USA, LLC v. Cisco Systems, Inc., 575 U.S. ____ (2015) held that an accused infringer’s good-faith belief of patent invalidity is not a defense to a claim of induced infringement and stressed that induced infringement requires knowledge of infringement (as opposed to … Continue reading this entry

Federal Circuit Limits Patent Exhaustion Doctrine for Complementary Technology

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In its 2013 decision in Keurig, Inc. v. Sturm Foods, Inc., the Federal Circuit held that a purveyor of coffee cartridges did not infringe Keurig’s coffee brewing patents because Keurig had already made an unrestricted sale of its brewing machines to end users, such that any further use of those machines was protected by the … Continue reading this entry

Defense to Patent Infringement if Acts Were Performed in a “Quasigovernmental” Capacity Pursuant to a Legal Obligation

A recent Federal Circuit opinion highlights a defense that is available to defendants whose alleged infringement occurred through activities that were undertaken for the United States. In particular, where the United States Government requires private parties to perform quasigovernmental functions pursuant to a legal obligation, a patent owner’s exclusive remedy is to bring a claim … Continue reading this entry

After the Supreme Court's Limelight Decision, Attention May Shift to Contract Analysis in Patent Cases

In Limelight Networks, Inc. v. Akamai Tech., Inc., the Supreme Court unanimously held that there can be no liability for induced infringement of a patented method where the steps of the method are carried out by separate actors. Yet, only one week later, the district court in Digital Reg of Tex., LLC v. Adobe Sys., … Continue reading this entry

Supreme Court Hears Argument in Limelight v. Akamai

The Supreme Court heard argument yesterday in Limelight Networks, Inc. v. Akamai Techs., Inc., which concerns the standard for inducing patent infringement under 35 U.S.C. 271(b). For those who have not followed (or don’t recall) the case’s long and winding road to the Supreme Court, the plaintiff Akamai alleged infringement of method claims directed at … Continue reading this entry

Considerations If Conceding Infringement Or Designing Around

A decision issued by the Federal Circuit earlier this year raises a few things to have in mind when considering whether to concede infringement and when planning to design around a patent. In Proveris Scientific Corp. v. Innovasystems, Inc., 739 F.3d 1367, 109 U.S.P.Q.2d 1314 (Fed. Cir. 2014) Innovasystems, Inc. (“Innova”) was sued by Proveris … Continue reading this entry

Declaratory Judgment Claimants: Which Products Are You Saying Don’t Infringe?

Declaratory judgment plaintiffs and counterclaimants in patent cases have long been accustomed to filing boilerplate claims that either do not identify an accused technology, or that do so in a cursory manner. Noninfringement pleadings typically read something like this: “We are entitled to declaratory judgment that we have not infringed any valid claim of the … Continue reading this entry

Native American Tribes Immune From Patent Infringement Suits

In the near future, Native American tribal organizations might consider expanding operations in many technological areas in view of recent court decisions indicating that tribes enjoy sovereign immunity from patent infringement suits. According to the courts, sovereign immunity applies to Native American tribes even for activities performed off the reservation and regardless of whether the activities … Continue reading this entry

Federal Circuit Decision Highlights Seldom-Used Doctrine of Equivalents Analysis

The Federal Circuit’s August 27, 2013 decision in Applied Medical Resources Corp. v. Tyco Healthcare Group LP (Case No. 2012-1412) (nonprecedential) relied on the seldom-used “difference in kind” test in analyzing infringement under the doctrine of equivalents, considering whether an accused product was different in kind – rather than just degree – from the claimed invention. … Continue reading this entry