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The Evolving Standard for Pleading Direct Patent Infringement

It has been a little more than half a year since the amendments to the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure abrogated Rule 84 and put an end to the Form 18 bare-bones style patent complaint.  The question on the minds of many patent litigators has been: What standard would emerge for pleading direct patent infringement … Continue reading this entry

Patent Venue Legislation Could Have A Dramatic Impact on Popular Patent Venues

This month, three United States Senators introduced the “Venue Equity and Non-Uniformity Elimination Act of 2016.”  The bill would dramatically narrow the venue statute that applies to patent cases and, it appears, prevent most cases from being litigated in the popular venues for patent cases, such as the Eastern District of Texas.… Continue reading this entry

The Threshold of Exceptionality: There Is a Line, and It Can Be Crossed

Non-practicing entity (“NPE”) plaintiffs beware and NPE defendants be delighted: sanctions for objectively unreasonable claims and conduct are alive and well. Defendants in NPE litigations, particularly in the Eastern District of Texas, received encouraging news recently when Judge Gilstrap granted $390,829 in fees to more than 20 defendants in response to motions for attorneys’ fees on … Continue reading this entry

NPEs Continue to Play Large Role in Patent Litigation

The annual patent litigation study recently released by PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP (PwC) sets forth some interesting trends in patent litigation, including that cases involving non-practicing entities (NPEs) continue to account for a large and increasing amount of patent cases. This may bolster recent calls by some to curb abusive patent litigation, which many largely attribute to certain … Continue reading this entry

"Patent Reform 2014" White Paper Available for Download

Over the past 2 years I’ve been closely following the slew of patent reform proposals in Congress, the Executive Branch, the Courts, and the 50 States.  I have yet to find a document that lists–much less explains–all the many, many proposals percolating in DC and across the country. So I wrote one: “PATENT REFORM 2014:  A Comprehensive Guide to Current … Continue reading this entry

Will the Supreme Court "Bar-B-Que" the Federal Circuit’s "Exceptional Case" Test? Early Views of Justices Ginsburg and Scalia

On October 1, 2013, the Supreme Court granted certiorari in two cases dealing with the fee-shifting provision in patent cases: Highmark Inc. v. Allcare Health Management Systems (No. 12-1163) and Octane Fitness, LLC v. ICON Health & Fitness, Inc. (No. 12-1184). The fee-shifting provision states that a “court in exceptional cases may award reasonable attorney … Continue reading this entry

The Joinder Provision of the AIA is Not a Substitute for Discretion

The Federal Circuit recently confirmed that district courts must still exercise discretion in deciding motions to sever where the heightened joinder requirements of the AIA are satisfied. In In re Nintendo, Co.¸ __ Fed. App’x __ (Fed. Cir. Sept. 25, 2013) (nonprecedential), UltimatePointer, LLC sued Nintendo and numerous video game retailers in the Eastern District of Texas … Continue reading this entry

Practical Implications of Rep. Goodlatte’s Proposed “Offer of Judgment” in Patent Suits

House Judiciary Chairman Bob Goodlatte (R-Va.) on May 23, 2013 released a discussion draft of legislation designed to curb abusive patent litigation. Among the draft’s various provisions is a section titled “Incentivizing Settlement in Patent Litigation.” This proposal would essentially expand today’s Federal Rule of Civil Procedure 68 “Offer of Judgment” to require “attorneys’ fees” in patent … Continue reading this entry